What is our responsibility as people who live, work, or worship in Davis to the original inhabitants of this land? What is the legacy of environmental racism? How can we heal and repair the harm? These and other critical questions guide a new educational opportunity being offered to the community this fall.

The Episcopal Church of St. Martin, a Cool Davis Coalition member congregation, will bring a series of lectures and workshops, Seeds of Justice, to Davis to highlight the work of scholars and cultural practitioners in this region – the ancestral homeland of the Patwin-Wintun people.

St. Martin’s developed the Seeds of Justice program to understand the racialized history of the land here in the epicenter of gold, greed and genocide. Through storytelling, discussions and hands-on workshops, participants will study the resistance and resilience of Native Californians to the ongoing social and environmental impacts of settlers in this region.

“We hope this will be a safe, honest and transformative space for our community to grapple with the legacy of injustice to this land and her people,” said Ann Liu, Chair of St. Martin’s Care for God’s Creation Committee. “Everyone is invited to come and learn with an open heart and mind.”

These events are free and open to the public; registration is required. The Episcopal Church of St. Martin is located at 640 Hawthorn Lane, Davis CA.

To register or for more information visit the Seeds of Justice webpage.

Wintun Homeland Stewardship: Stories of Native Ancestors with Diana Almendariz

On Sunday, September 12, 12:30pm, Diana Almendariz will present the first talk in this series, Wintun Homeland Stewardship: Stories of Native Ancestors, via videoconference.

Diana Almendariz, a cultural practitioner of Maidu/Wintun and Hupa/Yurok descent and traditions, will present September 12 and October 10 as part of the Seeds of Justice series. Courtesy photo.

Almendariz is a cultural practitioner of Maidu/Wintun and Hupa/Yurok descent and traditions. She was raised in a westernized city yet blessed with a grandmother who remembered the environmental treasures of the Sacramento Valley. Almendariz’ lifelong commitment to teaching environmental stewardship with a Native Californian cultural emphasis has been inspired by the memories, thoughts, and stories of her ancestors. On Sunday, October 10, 12:30pm, Almendariz will visit the Episcopal Church of St. Martin for a hands-on demonstration of cordage using native plants. The demonstration will be held outdoors with masks required; there is space for 30 participants.

Introduction to California Indian Homeland History by Professor of Ethnic Studies Melissa Moreno, Ph.D.

Other presentations in the series include: Introduction to California Indian Homeland History by Professor of Ethnic Studies Melissa Moreno, Ph.D., (September 26, 12:30pm, via videoconference) (pictured in the featured image for this article). Dr. Moreno will discuss California Native American history and ecology, addressing issues of land, policy, and diverse identity. She recommends that participants watch the following videos before her talk:

Gold, Greed, and Genocide

Gold, Greed, and Genocide 20 Years Later

Register at https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYtfuurpz8oHN2afS7CL9QESGhAieNWN66r

This event is free and open to the public; registration is required. For more information about Seeds of Justice, please see https://churchofstmartin.org/2021/08/12/land-based-ministries-hub-seeds-of-justice/. The program has been made possible by a grant from Episcopal Community Services of the Diocese of Northern California, with support from our partners, the Yolo Interfaith Alliance for Climate Justice and Yolo Climate Emergency Coalition.

Just Say “No” to Manifest Destiny by Alan Taylor, Ph.D.

Just Say “No” to Manifest Destiny by Alan Taylor, Ph.D., Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Professor of History at the University of Virginia (November 1, 5pm, at the Episcopal Church of St. Martin and via videoconference).

St. Martin’s will bring more Seeds of Justice speakers and events to the Davis region in winter and spring 2022. This program has been made possible by a grant from Episcopal Community Services of the Diocese of Northern California, with support from our partners, the Yolo Interfaith Alliance for Climate Justice and Yolo Climate Emergency Coalition.